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Computer Keyboard Shortcuts

100+ Computer Keyboard Shortcuts

keyboard shortcuts

This computer keyboard shortcut list will come in handy for both end users and network administrators alike. This is worth printing and keeping near your keyboard.

 Let’s be realistic here. Nobody is going to memorize all of these keyboard shortcuts.

What I suggest doing is printing this list then read each shortcut and highlight the ones that make your job a little easier.

Keyboard Shortcuts (Microsoft Windows)
1. CTRL+C (Copy)
2. CTRL+X (Cut)
… 3. CTRL+V (Paste)
4. CTRL+Z (Undo)
5. DELETE (Delete)
6. SHIFT+DELETE (Delete the selected item permanently without placing the item in the Recycle Bin)
7. CTRL while dragging an item (Copy the selected item)
8. CTRL+SHIFT while dragging an item (Create a shortcut to the selected item)
9. F2 key (Rename the selected item)
10. CTRL+RIGHT ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the next word)
11. CTRL+LEFT ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the previous word)
12. CTRL+DOWN ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the next paragraph)
13. CTRL+UP ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the previous paragraph)
14. CTRL+SHIFT with any of the arrow keys (Highlight a block of text)
SHIFT with any of the arrow keys (Select more than one item in a window or on the desktop, or select text in a document)
15. CTRL+A (Select all)
16. F3 key (Search for a file or a folder)
17. ALT+ENTER (View the properties for the selected item)
18. ALT+F4 (Close the active item, or quit the active program)
19. ALT+ENTER (Display the properties of the selected object)
20. ALT+SPACEBAR (Open the shortcut menu for the active window)
21. CTRL+F4 (Close the active document in programs that enable you to have multiple documents opensimultaneously)
22. ALT+TAB (Switch between the open items)
23. ALT+ESC (Cycle through items in the order that they had been opened)
24. F6 key (Cycle through the screen elements in a window or on the desktop)
25. F4 key (Display the Address bar list in My Computer or Windows Explorer)
26. SHIFT+F10 (Display the shortcut menu for the selected item)
27. ALT+SPACEBAR (Display the System menu for the active window)
28. CTRL+ESC (Display the Start menu)
29. ALT+Underlined letter in a menu name (Display the corresponding menu) Underlined letter in a command name on an open menu (Perform the corresponding command)
30. F10 key (Activate the menu bar in the active program)
31. RIGHT ARROW (Open the next menu to the right, or open a submenu)
32. LEFT ARROW (Open the next menu to the left, or close a submenu)
33. F5 key (Update the active window)
34. BACKSPACE (View the folder onelevel up in My Computer or Windows Explorer)
35. ESC (Cancel the current task)
36. SHIFT when you insert a CD-ROMinto the CD-ROM drive (Prevent the CD-ROM from automatically playing)

Dialog Box – Keyboard Shortcuts
1. CTRL+TAB (Move forward through the tabs)
2. CTRL+SHIFT+TAB (Move backward through the tabs)
3. TAB (Move forward through the options)
4. SHIFT+TAB (Move backward through the options)
5. ALT+Underlined letter (Perform the corresponding command or select the corresponding option)
6. ENTER (Perform the command for the active option or button)
7. SPACEBAR (Select or clear the check box if the active option is a check box)
8. Arrow keys (Select a button if the active option is a group of option buttons)
9. F1 key (Display Help)
10. F4 key (Display the items in the active list)
11. BACKSPACE (Open a folder one level up if a folder is selected in the Save As or Open dialog box)

Microsoft Natural Keyboard Shortcuts
1. Windows Logo (Display or hide the Start menu)
2. Windows Logo+BREAK (Display the System Properties dialog box)
3. Windows Logo+D (Display the desktop)
4. Windows Logo+M (Minimize all of the windows)
5. Windows Logo+SHIFT+M (Restore the minimized windows)
6. Windows Logo+E (Open My Computer)
7. Windows Logo+F (Search for a file or a folder)
8. CTRL+Windows Logo+F (Search for computers)
9. Windows Logo+F1 (Display Windows Help)
10. Windows Logo+ L (Lock the keyboard)
11. Windows Logo+R (Open the Run dialog box)
12. Windows Logo+U (Open Utility Manager)
13. Accessibility Keyboard Shortcuts
14. Right SHIFT for eight seconds (Switch FilterKeys either on or off)
15. Left ALT+left SHIFT+PRINT SCREEN (Switch High Contrast either on or off)
16. Left ALT+left SHIFT+NUM LOCK (Switch the MouseKeys either on or off)
17. SHIFT five times (Switch the StickyKeys either on or off)
18. NUM LOCK for five seconds (Switch the ToggleKeys either on or off)
19. Windows Logo +U (Open Utility Manager)
20. Windows Explorer Keyboard Shortcuts
21. END (Display the bottom of the active window)
22. HOME (Display the top of the active window)
23. NUM LOCK+Asterisk sign (*) (Display all of the subfolders that are under the selected folder)
24. NUM LOCK+Plus sign (+) (Display the contents of the selected folder)
25. NUM LOCK+Minus sign (-) (Collapse the selected folder)
26. LEFT ARROW (Collapse the current selection if it is expanded, or select the parent folder)
27. RIGHT ARROW (Display the current selection if it is collapsed, or select the first subfolder)

Shortcut Keys for Character Map
After you double-click a character on the grid of characters, you can move through the grid by using the keyboard shortcuts:
1. RIGHT ARROW (Move to the right or to the beginning of the next line)
2. LEFT ARROW (Move to the left or to the end of the previous line)
3. UP ARROW (Move up one row)
4. DOWN ARROW (Move down one row)
5. PAGE UP (Move up one screen at a time)
6. PAGE DOWN (Move down one screen at a time)
7. HOME (Move to the beginning of the line)
8. END (Move to the end of the line)
9. CTRL+HOME (Move to the first character)
10. CTRL+END (Move to the last character)
11. SPACEBAR (Switch between Enlarged and Normal mode when a character is selected)

Microsoft Management Console (MMC)
Main Window Keyboard Shortcuts
1. CTRL+O (Open a saved console)
2. CTRL+N (Open a new console)
3. CTRL+S (Save the open console)
4. CTRL+M (Add or remove a console item)
5. CTRL+W (Open a new window)
6. F5 key (Update the content of all console windows)
7. ALT+SPACEBAR (Display the MMC window menu)
8. ALT+F4 (Close the console)
9. ALT+A (Display the Action menu)
10. ALT+V (Display the View menu)
11. ALT+F (Display the File menu)
12. ALT+O (Display the Favorites menu)

MMC Console Window Keyboard Shortcuts
1. CTRL+P (Print the current page or active pane)
2. ALT+Minus sign (-) (Display the window menu for the active console window)
3. SHIFT+F10 (Display the Action shortcut menu for the selected item)
4. F1 key (Open the Help topic, if any, for the selected item)
5. F5 key (Update the content of all console windows)
6. CTRL+F10 (Maximize the active console window)
7. CTRL+F5 (Restore the active console window)
8. ALT+ENTER (Display the Properties dialog box, if any, for theselected item)
9. F2 key (Rename the selected item)
10. CTRL+F4 (Close the active console window. When a console has only one console window, this shortcut closes the console)

Remote Desktop Connection Navigation
1. CTRL+ALT+END (Open the Microsoft Windows NT Security dialog box)
2. ALT+PAGE UP (Switch between programs from left to right)
3. ALT+PAGE DOWN (Switch between programs from right to left)
4. ALT+INSERT (Cycle through the programs in most recently used order)
5. ALT+HOME (Display the Start menu)
6. CTRL+ALT+BREAK (Switch the client computer between a window and a full screen)
7. ALT+DELETE (Display the Windows menu)
8. CTRL+ALT+Minus sign (-) (Place a snapshot of the active window in the client on the Terminal server clipboard and provide the same functionality as pressing PRINT SCREEN on a local computer.)
9. CTRL+ALT+Plus sign (+) (Place asnapshot of the entire client window area on the Terminal server clipboardand provide the same functionality aspressing ALT+PRINT SCREEN on a local computer.)

Microsoft Internet Explorer Keyboard Shortcuts
1. CTRL+B (Open the Organize Favorites dialog box)
2. CTRL+E (Open the Search bar)
3. CTRL+F (Start the Find utility)
4. CTRL+H (Open the History bar)
5. CTRL+I (Open the Favorites bar)
6. CTRL+L (Open the Open dialog box)
7. CTRL+N (Start another instance of the browser with the same Web address)
8. CTRL+O (Open the Open dialog box,the same as CTRL+L)
9. CTRL+P (Open the Print dialog box)
10. CTRL+R (Update the current Web page)
11. CTRL+W (Close the current window)

Posted in How To's, Microsoft, What is?0 Comments

No extents were found for the plex

No extents were found for the plex

Yesterday a friend asked me to help him troubleshoot a problem he was having when he was attempting to setup RAID 1 also known as mirroring.  He wanted to mirror the Operating System hard drive to a second hard drive and told me he cant get the System Reserved partition mirrored.

I asked him to show me exactly how he was attempting to perform this task and as I suspected he mirrored the (Boot, Page, Crash Dump) partition which is most commonly known as the C: drive first.

Next he would attempt to mirror the (system Reserved Partition) which by default is 100 MB in physical size.

I remember when I tried this several years ago myself  I encountered the same problem and with some experimenting I figured out how to do it and below are the steps.

First if you already created a mirror in windows vista or windows 7 go ahead and break it.

Now back to square one here are the steps to mirroring windows vista or windows 7.

Step 1
Assuming you already know how to mirror drives. (Software Mirroring or Software RAID 1)
IF YOU DON’T KNOW HOW TO MIRROR DRIVES it is in your best interest to ask somebody that knows how to mirror drives to walk you through the process or better yet do it with you so you learn without screwing up.

Step 2
Mirror the (System Reserved) partition first.

After this completes, reboot the computer then mirror the C: drive then after the Resynching completes reboot again.

Now both partitions will be mirrored.

Final thought on this.
What does the error No extents were found for the plex mean?
I still don’t know.

 

 

Posted in Microsoft, Questions & Answers, RAID 1, RAID Levels, Software Raid, Windows 7, Windows Vista0 Comments

Google and Microsoft both scan your email

Microsoft’s ads make Google’s email scanning sound sinister, however it’s own scanning  to block spam  isn’t much different.

Microsoft’s anti-Google “Scroogled” campaign is based largely on the contention that rival Google “goes through” private email in order to target ads at users based on keywords. And that’s technically true. It’s also technically true that Microsoft, too, “goes through” private email, though its intent is different: Microsoft’s Outlook.com email service runs scans not to target ads, but to block spam.

Still, the scanning itself isn’t really much different. For Stefan Weitz, Microsoft’s senior director of online services, this is all a matter of “semantics.” The intent of Google’s  “going through” email is what makes that “going through” a bad thing, compared to Microsoft’s “going through,” which is entirely benign, he said in an interview Tuesday.

It can be argued that Google’s intent to target ads is just as benign as Microsoft’s intent to prevent spam. Clearly, Microsoft doesn’t think so, and it cites surveys showing that most people don’t even realize that Google targets ads at them based on what they’ve written in emails, and that when they learn this is the case, many of them are appalled.

But the campaign is heavily focused on the scanning part, which makes Google’s targeting sound sinister. It also makes it sound a little bit like Google employees, rather than computer algorithms, are doing the scanning.

“In the most general sense of the word, the ‘scan’ is the same,” in both cases, Weitz allows. But, he says, the intent makes all the difference. Also, he contends, Google isn’t nearly “transparent” enough about what it does with the information it collects, either from searches or from email. Further, he argues, while Microsoft’s scans look for keywords that are red flags for spam , Google is looking for all manner of keywords for ad-targeting.

Fair enough, though there has been a mighty backlash against the Scroogled campaign. Weitz says it doesn’t matter much, since the people doing the lashing are mostly people in a “bubble” – technology workers and journalists. “Everyday people,” he claims, are fine with the campaign, because it lets them know something that many of them didn’t: that Google’s software “reads” their emails to target ads at them.

Last week, the San Francisco public-media outlet KQED reported, based on an interview with Weitz, that the Scroogled campaign is over. It’s not. Weitz attributes the misinformation to a misunderstanding between him and the reporter. (Fortune, like many other publications, cited KQED’s erroneous story.) He says he meant only that the Scroogled TV spots are over for now and that Microsoft is moving on to a new phase of the campaign to take on some other aspect of Google to excoriate. He wouldn’t say what aspect that might be, but he talked a lot about Google’s privacy policies for its search function, so that might be a hint.

The campaign launched in November. A few weeks ago, it started a petition drive to collect signatures from people opposed to Google’s email privacy policies. Microsoft boasts that it has drawn 3.5 million people to the petition site and that 115,000 people have signed it. That amounts to what seems like a rather paltry success rate — about .03%. Not so, Weitz insists, since once on the site, people must fill out a form. He says the ratio is “pretty good” and is “better than what the White House requires” for its “We the People” initiative.

Google has issued only a single, terse statement in response to the Scroogled campaign: “Advertising keeps Google and many of the websites and services Google offers free of charge. We work hard to make sure that ads are safe, unobtrusive and relevant. No humans read your email or Google account information in order to show you advertisements or related information.”

Posted in Google, Microsoft, News, Tech News0 Comments

You need a touchscreen to really use windows 8

Before you run to a computer store in Orlando Florida or anywhere for the matter and buy a Windows 8 laptop or desktop computer you need to read this. Microsoft’s Windows 8 best features are not going to do you one bit of good unless you specifically have a touch screen computer or monitor.

If  you intend to use your mouse and keyboard then its best to stay far away from Windows 8 and use another operating system for your specific needs and wants.

The ability to tap, touch, pinch, and swipe your finger across a touchscreen computer – laptop is where the Windows 8 operating system really comes to life. You can still use Windows 8 without a touch screen monitor however that’s the same principle as tossing your TV remote control aside and physically getting up off your couch every time you want to manually change your TV station.

Remarkably few people are actually opening their purses or wallets to purchase touchscreen computers and or laptops. Just 7% of Microsoft Windows laptops sold through December of 2012 were touch screen computers.

One challenge is there are not many high quality touchscreen laptops on the market today. To give you an example. The retail giant Best Buy offers more than 700 different laptops for sale through local retail stores and online. Only 30 or so of those laptops have touch screens and only a handful of those 30 different make and model touch screen laptops are high quality. Most are made up of low quality hardware and are considered to be junk. Only two of the the 30 touchscreen laptops earned a high quality rating from consumers who bought them.

Another downside to these touchscreen laptops is they will cost you on average of $120 to $180 more then a non touch screen laptop computer. The most affordable touchscreen laptop is a 11.6 inch Asus VivoBook which sells for around $500 give or a take a few dollars while the full size touch screen laptops are around $625 and up.

Granted that’s not a huge expense for a laptop, this does provoke consumers to really think whether they feel its worth it to shell out the extra money for having a touchscreen laptop or touchscreen computer system.

Touch screen monitors and laptops are an are not an afterthought in Windows 8. Touch screens are the core to the entire Windows 8 operating system. The whole Windows 8 OS virtually begs users to touch the computer screen with their fingers. Windows 8 is outright clunky and cumbersome when used with a keyboard and mouse and will leave computer users feelings disappointed and left out unless they are using a touch screen laptop or monitor.

Getting people to adopt to touch screens on their desktop or laptop computers wont be an easy chore because people are use to using a real mouse and keyboard to control their computers.

Windows 8 is pretty cool yes but the reality is they are not going to replace desktop computers in the offices of businesses and other organizations. Windows 8 is best for home use for fun and entertainment.

Today’s touch screen technology is being heavily dominated by today’s smart phones such as the apple Iphone, Droids, and tablets which has shown very little vendor and consumer demand for larger size touch screens needed for touchscreen desktop and touchscreen laptop computers. This means suppliers are not manufacturing many touchscreens for computer systems, which also drives up the price for touchscreen laptops and monitors.

 

 

 

Posted in Computers, Laptops, Microsoft, Operating Systems0 Comments

Microsoft discloses Windows 8

Microsoft unveiled its next generation operating system which is called Microsoft Windows 8. Windows 8 is a drastic overhaul when compared to previous versions of Microsoft windows including Windows 7 and Windows Vista. Microsoft is gearing its focus on touch screen devices in an effort to compete against the Apple Ipad tablet. During a software developers conference in Anaheim California Microsoft’s Steven Sinofsky whom is the president of Microsoft’s Windows and Windows Live division. Steven spoke in depth about the new and upcoming operating system Microsoft Windows 8. Microsoft is going to be facing an uphill battle when it goes to sell its new operating system to businesses. Microsoft Windows 8 is expected to be released sometime in 2012 but as of right now nobody knows for sure. Now on the other hand consumers will most likely jump to the new operating system and many personal computer and laptop manufactures will likely roll out future computers with windows 8 for consumers to enjoy. This means that it is very possible we may see new computers in retail stores with windows 8 pre loaded on then again nobody knows for sure. Microsoft Steven Sinofsky stated he believes this new OS will be powering the table computers of the future. “We are going to completely reimage Microsoft Windows from the ground up inside out so it functions completely different with the memory in a computer all the way to how it interacts with new CPS’s – computer processors and all the way up to a brand spanking new GUI – graphical user interface. Some of the GUI changes are going to be focusing on the touch input controls which geared more for tablet computers – touch screens. Other features will include a built in “pop up keyboard inside the operating system and a built in spell checker.

 

Posted in Computers, Microsoft, News0 Comments

Memory limits for the different versions of the Microsoft Windows 7 Operating System

QUESTION:
How much memory can you use with Microsoft Windows 7 ?

ANSWER:
First without getting into a bunch of technical detail here is a straight to the point breakdown of how much memory is supported with the different flavors / versions of Microsoft 7.

Microsoft offers it’s Windows 7 operating system in six different versions.

First you need to know that the maximum RAM – memory limit for 32-bit Windows 7 operating system editions is 4GB.
Which is more then enough for the average user.

For power users, special application computers, etc 4 GB of memory may not be enough.

The 64 bit editions of Microsoft Windows 7 support the following amounts of memory.

Microsoft starter Edition: 8GB
Microsoft Home Basic Edition: 8GB
Microsoft Home Premium: 16GB
Microsoft Professional : 192GB
Microsoft Enterprise: 192GB
Microsoft Ultimate: 192GB

These memory limits are similar to those with Microsoft Vista flavors / editions.

Which version is right for you?
We will get to that in another article….:)

Posted in Computers, Memory, Microsoft, Operating Systems, Questions & Answers, Software, What is?0 Comments

How to Enable iPhone Sync with Microsoft Outlook 2007

Ensure that Microsoft Outlook 2007 is enabling the iPhone to connect with it. Try these steps if the sync is not working with Outlook 2007.

1. Open Outlook 2007 and click Tools > Trust Center.

2. Under Categories, click Add-ins.

3. Under Details, look for iTunes add-in under Inactive Application Add-ins.

4. In the Manage box, click COM Add-ins, and then click Go.

5. In the COM Add-Ins dialog box, select the iTunes sync add-in.

 

6. Click OK.

Posted in APPLE, How To's, IPhone, Microsoft, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Outlook0 Comments

How to find a Microsoft Outlook .pst file

If you do not know where an old or existing .pst file resides on your computer and you want to add this .pst file to your Outlook profile, this section explains how to search for the .pst file and then add it to your Outlook profile.

To search for the .pst file, follow these steps:

  1. To search for the .pst files:
    • If you are running Windows Vista: Click Start, and then Computer. Locate the search window in the top right corner.
    • If you are running Windows XP: Click Start , and then click Search .
    • If you are running Microsoft Windows 95 or Microsoft Windows 98: Click Start , point to Find , and then click Files or Folders .
    • If you are running Microsoft Windows 2000 or Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition (Me): Click Start, point to Search, and then click For Files or Folders .
  2. Type *.pst, and then press ENTER or click Find Now. Locate the desired .pst file you want to add to Outlook. Record the location of the .pst file.
  3. Close the search window and start Outlook. Click on the File menu, and then select Data File Management.
  4. Click on the Add button, and then choose the correct type of .pst file to add: If your .pst file was created in Outlook 2007, then choose Office Outlook Personal Folders File (.pst). If your .pst file was created in an older version of Outlook, such as Outlook 97, 2000, or XP, then choose Outlook 97-2002 Personal Folders File (.pst).
  5. Navigate to the location of the desired .pst file that you found during your search above. Select the .pst file and click OK.
  6. Either type a custom name for the .pst file or accept the default name. Click OK. Click Close to exit the current window.

Outlook now displays that .pst file in the Outlook folder list.

If these methods did not help you, you might want to ask a network administrator to help you.

Posted in Computers, Email, Exchange Server, How To's, Microsoft, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Outlook0 Comments

How to back up Microsoft Outlook settings files

If you have customized settings, such as toolbar settings and Favorites, that you want to replicate on another computer or restore to your computer, you might want to include the following files in your backup:

  • Outcmd.dat: This file stores toolbar and menu settings.
  • ProfileName.fav: This is your Favorites file, which includes the settings for the Outlook bar (only applies to Outlook 2002 and older versions).
  • ProfileName.xml: This file stores the Navigation Pane preferences (only applies to Outlook 2003 and newer versions).
  • ProfileName.nk2: This file stores the Nicknames for AutoComplete.
  • Signature files: Each signature has its own file and uses the same name as the signature that you used when you created it. For example, if you create a signature named MySig, the following files are created in the Signatures folder:
    • MySig.htm: This file stores the HTML Auto signature.
    • MySig.rtf: This file stores the Microsoft Outlook Rich Text Format (RTF) Auto signature.
    • MySig.txt: This file stores the plain text format Auto signature.

    The location of the signature files depends on the version of Windows that you are running. Use this list to find the appropriate location:

    • Windows Vista or Windows 7: Drive\users\Username\appdata, where Drive represents the drive that Outlook was installed to and Username represents the user name that Outlook was installed under.
    • Windows XP or Windows 2000: Drive\Documents and Settings\Username\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook, where Drive represents the drive that Outlook was installed to and Username represents the user name that Outlook was installed under.
    • Windows 98 or Windows Me: Drive\Windows\Local Settings\Application Data, where Drive represents the drive that Outlook was installed to.

Note If you use Microsoft Word as your e-mail editor, signatures are stored in the Normal.dot file as AutoText entries. You should back up this file also.

Posted in Computers, Data Backups, Email, Exchange Server, How To's, Microsoft, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Outlook0 Comments

How to use the Personal Folder Backup utility to automate the backup of .pst files

Your .pst file contains all the local Outlook folders, such as Calendar, Inbox, Tasks, Sent Items, Outbox, Deleted Items, and user-created folders. To automatically back up these folders, create a backup of your .pst file.

The Microsoft Outlook Personal Folders Backup tool is an Outlook add-in that automates the backup process. The Microsoft Outlook Personal Folders Backup tool works with Outlook 2000, Outlook 2002, Outlook 2003, and Outlook 2007. To download the add-in, visit the following Microsoft Web site:

With the Personal Folders Backup add-in, you can choose which of your .pst files you want to back up and how frequently you want to back them up.

Each .pst file contains all your Outlook folders. This includes the Inbox, Calendar, and Contacts. You can have a single .pst file (usually called “Internet Folders” or “Personal Folders” in your Folder List), but you might also have an additional .pst file that you use for archiving (“Archive Folders”). The Personal Folders Backup add-in lets you back up any of these .pst files.

Note The Personal Folders Backup add-in backs up only .pst files. If you have a Microsoft Exchange Server mailbox, the server mailbox folders are backed up regularly by the server administrator.

To use the Personal Folders Backup add-in, follow these steps:

  1. Start Outlook.
  2. On the File menu, click Backup.
  3. Click Options and select the .pst files that you want to back up.

To use the Personal Folders Backup add-in with Outlook 2010, follow these steps:

  1. Start Outlook.
  2. On the Ribbon, click Add-ins.
  3. Click Options and select the .pst files that you want to back up.

The Personal Folders Backup add-in can back up files to a disk. However, the add-in cannot spread the .pst file across multiple disks. When you change backup options, select a storage location that has sufficient free space to handle your whole .pst file.

Posted in Computer Repair, Computers, Exchange Server, How To's, Microsoft, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Outlook0 Comments

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